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SkinnedAussie

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When I walk near a magpie nesting area, I wear a cap but have sunglasses facing to the rear. The magpies think they are being watched and don't bother me.

Some cyclists I know have eyes painted on to their helmets, for the same reason.
 

Fear The Spear

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So they're deterred by the sight of human eyes, or even a depiction of them ?
Interesting, I figured it would be the opposite - that staring eyes would provoke them into violence.
If another strange creature is staring at an animal, I would think they would take that as a threat, and act in self-defense.
 

SkinnedAussie

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The eye trick works with plovers as well. They also tend to dive on any perceived threat to their nest and/or hatchlings.

It's amazing how magpies can be so savage one minute, and so placid the next. It was only yesterday that I was hand feeding a magpie chick.
 

SkinnedAussie

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Hoopsnakes are dangerous snakes native to Australia. Commonly found in bushland and the outback, Hoopsnakes are NOT lethal, but are still dangerous when confronted. Although usually quite timid animals, Hoopsnakes have been known to chase down and attack animals and humans during their breeding period. If bitten by the Hoopsnake, headaches, vomiting, and temporary blindness and paralysis may occur.

What makes the Hoopsnake different from other snakes in the world is their ability to to roll, in a way much like a wheel or hula-hoop (hence the name, Hoopsnake). They bite onto their tail, which is very thick and callused, and use their strengthened spines to roll into a circular shape and roll around. Using this method, the Hoopsnake can reach up to 60km/h.

Hoopsnake.jpg

Although lots is known about the Hoopsnakes, they are not not very well known as they should be. They were never featured on any of Steve Irwin's television programs or his movies, which is quite disappointing. The Hoopsnake is a beautiful creature which deserves to be known throughout the world.

There is no definite breeding season with Hoopsnakes, as they breed year round. A female Hoopsnake will find a new mate every year. Couples only breed once a year, with the female laying around 10 to 15 eggs in a batch. On average, only 8 survive, due to the Hoopsnake being the main food source of eagles and hawks.

Hoopsnakes feed on small marsupials such as bilbies, mice, rats and quolls. Baby hoopsnakes often eat crickets and other small insects. Hoopsnakes live around 8 years, and in their life time have been known to grow up to 1.5 metres long. They range from a light, olive green to a darker black in colour, depending on the age. This is why it is extremely difficult to identify the Hoopsnake, because the colours are so different.
 

Boone

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Skinned Aussie is no longer with us, unfortunately. But that's a nice thought - here's wishing the best for our Aussie brothers and sisters!
 

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