What does Sherman Smith do exactly?

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Aston Gambino

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Anyone shed some light on his role here? Zorn obviously calls the plays, but does Smith help game plan, or provide insight to how a defense should be attacked or anything like that? Or his role completely insignificant?

I don't hear that much about him, and I don't know if I've ever even seen him on TV or on the sidelines. Curious to know how he fits into this whole thing, if he does at all.
 

Spence

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Presumably, Smith helps craft the game plan and will suggest plays during the game. I assume it is rather like what Dan Henning did during Gibbs 1.0.
 

Bulldog

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Sherman Smith was Jim Zorn's running back when he was the qb in Seattle.

As far as I can determine Smith is here to help Jiim out with anything he needs on offense.

But in reality I don't think his authority extends to that of the typical coordinator.

He is sort of like a sorcerer's apprentice.

The fact Zorn has insisted on being the HC, nominal OC and quarterbacks coach is one of the reasons he is failing as a leader, he has spread himself too thin because he failed to hire experienced people in key spots.

If you notice, Smith, Stump Mitchell were both jumped in responsibility in coming to Washington.

I don't see Stan Hixon as being a highly regarded WR coach. Has anyone heard him credited with developing any players?
 

Aston Gambino

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Sherman Smith was Jim Zorn's running back when he was the qb in Seattle.

As far as I can determine Smith is here to help Jiim out with anything he needs on offense.

But in reality I don't think his authority extends to that of the typical coordinator.

He is sort of like a sorcerer's apprentice.

The fact Zorn has insisted on being the HC, nominal OC and quarterbacks coach is one of the reasons he is failing as a leader, he has spread himself too thin because he failed to hire experienced people in key spots.

If you notice, Smith, Stump Mitchell were both jumped in responsibility in coming to Washington.

I don't see Stan Hixon as being a highly regarded WR coach. Has anyone heard him credited with developing any players?
Interesting point(s). Haven't heard much on Hixon.

Agree with Zorn possibly spreading himself too thin, but do you think he would have been a successful OC, if that's all he was here to do?
 

Spence

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Agree with Zorn possibly spreading himself too thin, but do you think he would have been a successful OC, if that's all he was here to do?
I don't think we'll ever find out, but it is possible he could have been a successful OC with someone guiding him. Zorn doesn't look at all ready to be a head coach to me. As an OC, he would definitely need a head coach giving him guidance. He's not like a Norv Turner type, whom a head coach could basically leave alone. Zorn needs supervision. Unfortunately, he's the guy in charge.
 

servumtuum

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Interesting point(s). Haven't heard much on Hixon.

Agree with Zorn possibly spreading himself too thin, but do you think he would have been a successful OC, if that's all he was here to do?
I imagine that would have depended on who and what type of HC had been in place. If the HC was insistent on doing the play calling, Zorn might have wound up like Sherm Smith is now-an observer letting him know how the flow of the game was going. If the HC was willing to delegate play calling, Zorn might have gained some much-needed (!) experience in that area. With that under his belt it could be he may have wound up being a pretty decent HC at a later point. Being that he was still QB coach at Seattle when Snyder hired him, having a head coach to "show him the ropes", so to speak. as an entry-level OC could have been beneficial all around. Spending several years watching Holmgren was useful, but hands-on as an OC under the tutelage of a HC is better.
 

PennSkinsfan

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Interesting point(s). Haven't heard much on Hixon.

Agree with Zorn possibly spreading himself too thin, but do you think he would have been a successful OC, if that's all he was here to do?
The fact that Malcolm Kelly and Devin Thomas don't seem to be developing well in the passing game makes me wonder about Hixon. How many years now have wide receivers getting open and running proper routes been an issue for this team?
 

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