Fact or Fiction? 8 gas saving myths.

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fansince62

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Miles Monroe

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http://money.msn.com/saving-money/article.aspx?post=9178878e-62c1-46d4-80eb-849f4fb2a7fe&GT1=33026

I'm calling bull**** on number 7, for the simple fact that gas cannot defy gravity and travel upward without help.
I agree...

Many fuel cells are pressurized, so in essence the liquid could defy gravity in the absolute perfect situation, but the odds are slim to none. Most fuel systems at this point will only let fuel over flow while the cap is off. Also, fuel going back into the stations tank is almost imposable. First off, only a small percentage of the areas of the country have stage three vapor recovery, which is a vacuuming system to recover vapor as you fill the tank. Generally, even an old school fuel fill nozzle will shut off the flow before you could spill a lot, or the vapor recovery system could suck up any liquid if it was actually drawing enough vacuum.

Changing your oxygen sensor is a waste of money for the most part. While they do fail from time to time, they don't really have a service life on most brands, and it's just a money maker for the shop. I think GM came out with changing it at a pre-determined mileage interval. They can last for the life of the vehicle doing their job within their operating range. When they go bad, you'll normally get a trouble light shortly after, and a trouble code for a rich running condition. Modern engine management systems have a nice range of compensation, and with other inputs to the ECU, even an oxygen sensor that is at the outer edge of it's operating range, is not going to throw off the running of the engine enough to really throw off your fuel mileage.

Tire pressure will effect your mileage if your one of those people who never checks the tires, and depends on it being taken care of at oil change intervals. In 3K, you can easily be 15 PSI low. I actually proved this to my daughter a few weeks ago. She had done a trip on the highway. About two weeks later, I checked her tires, all were low, and I adjusted accordingly. She did the same rout the next day, and did get slightly better mileage. A bout 13 miles on a tank full, and that's not a lot, but it is a gain. The new tires are a gimmick in reality, but proper inflation is key to getting the max mileage.

The real key to getting the best mileage you can is really a combination of things you can do. Tire pressure, regular oil service, and fuel injector cleaning from time to time will keep your mileage at the max. With all the junk they put in gas these days is causing so many problems. A fuel injector is meant to deliver a fine mist (atomized fuel /air mixture), but when they get dirty, you'll often get droplets of raw fuel... not atomized, and it will give you a rich condition, and poor fuel economy. You can get the same condition with carbureted vehicles too, so keeping the fuel system clean is one of the most important thing you can do.
 

fansince62

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so...fellas.....I drive a MB and was told the other day that I needed new brake pads and rotors. Is this unusual for an auto that only has 30K mis on it after two yrs?
 

DieselPwr44

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so...fellas.....I drive a MB and was told the other day that I needed new brake pads and rotors. Is this unusual for an auto that only has 30K mis on it after two yrs?
If you have never put a set of pads on it before,30k is alot of a mileage on a set of pads and it's a wonder that you haven't heard metal to metal contact when braking.
 

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If you have never put a set of pads on it before,30k is alot of a mileage on a set of pads and it's a wonder that you haven't heard metal to metal contact when braking.
This. The rotors would normally never go bad in 30k miles, but the fact you haven't ever had the brake pads changed, it's a wonder that the pads and rotors are your only problems. You'll likely have a problem with ball joints in the near future, because the worse off your pads and rotors are, the more vibration you will get, screwing everything up eventually.

When I bought my car, the right front ball joint was completely shot because of this exact same problem - the dude went almost 40k miles without a brake change before I got the car. So my first inspection, they informed me that the ball joint was shot. I took it home to fix myself, and it was so bad that it had worn completely through the rubber, and welded itself into the arm from friction. I tried torching it, and could not get it to release. I eventually had to pay a shop $280 to cut it out and fabricate a new arm and replace the ball joint. The tie rods and everything were destroyed. And it all started from a guy not getting the brake pads replaced.
 

Miles Monroe

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so...fellas.....I drive a MB and was told the other day that I needed new brake pads and rotors. Is this unusual for an auto that only has 30K mis on it after two yrs?
The biggest problem with brakes is the inability to service the rotors as was done in the past. Techs these days are trained to replace, not repair. They look at the specs, and if your close, there gonna sell you. I doubt the place you had it checked out at even has a brake lathe. People don't cut rotors and drums much any more for a few reasons. Liability is a huge reason, and cost of replacement parts and labor is often close to the cost of resurfacing and labor. Many people haven't a clue how to resurface composite rotors, which is another reason.

If they weren't metal on metal (grinding), odds are you have a bit of run out (warped) on the rotors, and that's why they want to replace them. If you had a pulsation in the pedal, you need rotors because many manufacturers do not allow the dealer to resurface. Contrary to popular belief, pads can last much longer 30K depending on type of materiel, driving style, and vehicle use... lots of stop and go, or mostly highway. Sintered pads can give you very high mileage before needing replacement.

It's not uncommon to have vehicles with over 50K before needing new pads, though generally 25 to 35K is average for a vehicle getting mixed driving use. I had a customer with just under 100K on the original pads and shoes. He was a salesmen, and did almost entirely highway driving.

There's also the mentality in the business that if you can afford a high end vehicle, you can afford the repair costs. All of my current customers know that BMW actually stands for "Bring My Wallet." I have no doubt the Benz is no different.
 

fansince62

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The biggest problem with brakes is the inability to service the rotors as was done in the past. Techs these days are trained to replace, not repair. They look at the specs, and if your close, there gonna sell you. I doubt the place you had it checked out at even has a brake lathe. People don't cut rotors and drums much any more for a few reasons. Liability is a huge reason, and cost of replacement parts and labor is often close to the cost of resurfacing and labor. Many people haven't a clue how to resurface composite rotors, which is another reason.

If they weren't metal on metal (grinding), odds are you have a bit of run out (warped) on the rotors, and that's why they want to replace them. If you had a pulsation in the pedal, you need rotors because many manufacturers do not allow the dealer to resurface. Contrary to popular belief, pads can last much longer 30K depending on type of materiel, driving style, and vehicle use... lots of stop and go, or mostly highway. Sintered pads can give you very high mileage before needing replacement.

It's not uncommon to have vehicles with over 50K before needing new pads, though generally 25 to 35K is average for a vehicle getting mixed driving use. I had a customer with just under 100K on the original pads and shoes. He was a salesmen, and did almost entirely highway driving.

There's also the mentality in the business that if you can afford a high end vehicle, you can afford the repair costs. All of my current customers know that BMW actually stands for "Bring My Wallet." I have no doubt the Benz is no different.
uh oh...so pumping the brakes is not a good habit pattern?

true about Benz...though I got a very, very good deal when the economy was rock bottom two years ago and stuff was sitting on the lots forever. there are also non-vendor shops that use stock parts and qualified mechs...but at lower rates than the dealership.
 

Burgundy Burner

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Doing a nice little bump here...

I have yet to pay more than $3.00 for a gallon of gas - ever. The day before gas prices rose in the wake of Katrina, I took the advice of a gas station attendant and filled up each of my vehicles (three at the time). The prices came down within a month.

In 2008, I filled up each vehicle in late winter (again, three at the time, but one was newer now) and had surgery a few days later. I wasn't able to drive for more than four months and by late July, I was back on the road - but sparingly. I was able to stretch the fuel in each one to late October. By then, prices were well below the $3.00 threshold.

Fast forward to now. I have two vehicles nowadays and both were filled to the max at the end of February - about two days before the price broke that same $3.00 barrier. Both vehicles are at just over half a tank. In addition, I have three five gallon cans that have unleaded gasoline in them. With careful planning, I can make it to mid August. My plan is to use my bike to ride to the gym most days (it's only a 1.5 mile ride) and to Shop-Rite as well (about one mile away).

The price of gas has dropped nearly fifty cents on the commodities market over the last week or so. Yes, there is a method to my madness here, but it is possible that I can pull this off again. Time will tell.
 

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