July 31, 2012
Redskins Park


Executive Vice President/Head Coach Mike Shanahan

On the status of offensive tackle Jammal Brown:
“No but I will find out a little bit later this evening. He should be back here tomorrow night, I do know that. I will get a good feel tomorrow and share that with you.”

On the status of wide receiver Joshua Morgan:
“He has a little hamstring pull. I don’t think it is anything too serious. But it was sore enough where he couldn’t practice today. He went through walkthroughs and looked like about 50 percent. He’s a little bit sore. Hopefully it will just be a couple days.”

On the status of fullback Darrel Young:
“I think he is going to be a little bit longer. I think he may be a week to two weeks. He’s got a pretty good strain in that hamstring.”

On the plans for the fullback position against the Buffalo Bills:
“We have different groups. We could put two halfbacks back there. Our tight ends could come back there and play the fullback position. Tailbacks got to play fullback, our tight ends got to play full back. We will find out which is the best group.”

On moving practice into the indoor training facility:
“That was a first. Maybe we did it one other time in OTA’s. It’s nice to have that facility. We got a good workout in. Normally we are in closed conditions. You’re in and you’re going to wait about a half hour to 45 minutes and have got to get loosened up. We were able to go into the bubble, get a workout, and really finish on time.”

On the progress of linebacker Perry Riley in his second season in the NFL:
“I think Perry is going to be a heck of a football player. He’s got natural instincts. He’s obviously a lot more comfortable with the system going into this year. He is a playmaker. He has great speed, great agility and always seems to be around the football. There are some people that are just natural football players and he is one of those guys.”

On the benefit of a full offseason for linebacker Perry Riley:
“It’s a big plus to be able to be in meetings for eight weeks with your coaches a couple hours a day and just go over the system. But actually to get a chance to go on the field and work on a number of the little nuances that you have to go through and learn the new system especially when he’s starting from the first year at least a whole season, but he enjoyed meeting. He’s really starting to become a student of the game. Being around a guy like London Fletcher I think really helps him and you can see that he’s getting better and better.”

On the difference in cornerback DeAngelo Hall learning to play the nickel:
“He’s capable of playing a number of different positions. He can play corner. He can play nickel. He can play dime. He can play safety and another thing he does is he has great ball skills. If he sees the ball coming in his area, he’s going to intercept it. So he’s got a chance to get us turnovers which is great because most games are decided by the turnover ratio. He gives us a chance to get some big plays, but I think he’s energized. I think it’s fun for him to see the improvement of our football team. We’re a little bit younger. We’re a little bit faster and quicker. I think as a veteran he sees that so he’s a little bit more excited.”

On if he was disappointed in DeAngelo Hall’s play in 2011:
“I think that’s why some people get hungry. You don’t have great years every year. He had a Pro Bowl year and like you mentioned was the MVP of the Pro Bowl and hopefully he has a great year this year.”

On the importance of a full offseason for wide receiver Aldrick Robinson after the lockout in 2011:
“Well, it’s everybody. It’s everybody on the football team. When you have a lockout, you don’t have any players getting the chance to come in and learn the system. You’re not going to make strides, but I think this is the first offseason that I’ve been around that you’ve had that much time to spend with players actually watching film.”

On how Aldrick Robinson can improve after a full offseason:
“I think being able to do the things that Perry Riley has been able to do. Right from the beginning, you know, meet everyday, talk for a couple hours. You’re never in a rush. You’re kind of relaxed. It’s not like you’re going to go out there and practice for a couple of hours. But, then again, you get a chance to watch the film, learn the terminology, do the little things the right way, where the common things all of a sudden are just automatic. That’s what he’s able to do now. Not think, play.”

On Robert Griffin III’s decision making:
“That’s why you practice—to make sure it becomes easier and easier. That’s why you have repetition. That’s why you have practice. That’s why they say hey, the third year is a lot different than the first year because the whole game slows down. And so every quarterback needs that repetition. You know, I put quarterbacks in a situation where they’re behind and they’ve got to win the game. You know, just because they haven’t had those reps, they’re going to make some mistakes. So hopefully your defense is playing very well and your offense, your running game is doing a good job where you don’t have to put all that pressure on that quarterback. Because there’s some growing pains. That is natural with the position. But he’s doing a heck of a job. He’s come in and, like I’ve said, we’ve had the offseason. We’ve had a lot of time to meet. He’s picked things up very quickly, and I’m sure he’s looking forward to playing some preseason games.”

On wide receiver Brandon Banks:
“Nothing different than we’ve talked about over the last couple of years. You know, I think that he’s well aware that he’s got to help us at the wide receiver position, not just special teams. Anytime they go from the 30-yard line to the 35-yard line, have those same kickoffs and punts, obviously they kick away from you. He’s got to help us as a wide receiver as well. I think he’s doing an excellent job thus far.”

On whether or not he sees more out of Brandon Banks this year than last year:
“Yeah, I think he was a little banged up [last year]. And at the same time, I don’t think he knew how to be a pro player. He didn’t know how to take care of his body. He didn’t know how to do the little things the right way. I think he’s matured, and he understands that if he’s going to play in the National Football League, he’s got to be at the top of his game. I think he’s had an excellent offseason program, getting in top shape and doing the things he’s got to do.”

On if running back Tim Hightower has had any setbacks:
“No. Anytime you’ve got an ACL, it’s going to take you awhile to cut naturally. And instead of keeping him on PUP, I thought it’d be better for him to come in and do the football drills and feel more comfortable and just going out there and cutting. And if we think he’s able to go in the 95 percent range, we’re going to give him some more reps for it to become second nature. But he wants to get in there, he wants to compete and he’s getting better every day. And when we think he’s ready to go, we’ll put him in.”

On if he thinks Tim Hightower is 95 percent:
“No. But you can see it when he runs. I have no idea when it’s going to be. Hopefully soon.”

On what he expects of defensive lineman Jarvis Jenkins this season:
“Well, he was having a heck of a preseason last year when he got hurt against Baltimore. And he was a difference maker inside. Anytime someone comes off an ACL, you’re always hoping that there’s no setback. And thus far there has been no setback. And he’s looked very impressive. So, we’ll evaluate him through these preseason games and hopefully there is no setback. He’s the type of defensive linemen that we expect him to be. Very big, very powerful and a guy that can help us win.”

On the key to the running back’s health:
“You never know. Sometimes I’ve gone through six running backs in a season and at the end Peyton Hillis turned out to be one of our best running backs and he was a fullback going in. So you really never know what happens. You know, sometimes it’s unfortunate a guy has a sprained ankle, a guy has a twisted knee, sometimes it’s an ACL. And then I’ve been fortunate for a couple of years where one guy has made it through the entire season. So, it’s like all positions. You’ve got to be a little lucky and hopefully we’re a little bit lucky this year.”

On if it’s mentally stressful knowing you have to carry the load of the running back:
“I don’t believe so. I don’t think so. Some guys can’t handle the load because their bodies don’t allow them to handle the load. They’re not quite big enough or powerful enough to carry the ball 25-30 times a game. But some guys are. You’ve just got to be fortunate enough to stay healthy.”